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in. and i do what i am interested in. says history have any place of foreign policy? of course. this semester we do elegy bt rights, education, and students read material from all sides of the issues. >>host: day ms washington? >> nine this the of little bit of power because the matter how small the agency or miniscule the power when people have problems problems, sometimes you can help them. with the commission imus being able to bring people that no one heard from war would be listened to. >> this is your third or fourth book? >>guest: no. have written many more. maybe nine or 10. i am working on one right now. the topic is what does that mean, it is on voter fraud. i found a place in louisiana where they seem to have a persistent record of voter fraud from the 19th century until now. i was given records that nobody else has. so if you want to see voter suppression here it is. >> when we you see that? >> what about the term post racial? >> they are an idiot. there is a big debate about this when obama was selected by the democrats but we are beyond thinking about issues of ra
out. >> ambassador eizenstat come israel is one of the few foreign-policy issues in the 2012 campaign. mitt romney saying he a sinuous anti-semite between the u.s. and israel. is the u.s. relationship and vice versa a healthy relationship? >> it is a remarkable relationship between one of the nations that have the smallest majority in israel had our great country. it's almost a mystical relationship when he think of how much support we have showered on israel and how much support we get back. it is due to the fact that this is not just a jewish support. barely 2% of the population united states. it is because we have shared values, shared enemies and islamic terrorism that many people in the united states viewed israel as the holy land. not just jews, but not jews as well. it's a remarkable time when there's so much polarization between republicans and democrats. it's one of the few foreign-policy issues that actually unite democrats and republicans. >> "the future of the jews." is your book title provocative in any way and do you mean it to be? >> i mean it to be because 10 people wh
it came to foreign-policy. years later he told former aide frank gannon during a series of interviews that pat always handled herself properly even during sensitive diplomatic conversations that she might inadvertently overhear. he explained that she quote listens and nods but never makes comments of our own. at same time however he relied on her to notice things he did not because as he put it, she was very observant. giving pat some responsibility and small diplomatic tasks also provided nixon with cover when they increasingly vocal feminist demanded a role in local policy. she was a woman he could trust to do only what he expected her to do. pats foreign travel did more than gifford desire for venture visiting new places, it was a way of reconnecting her husband and to the dick and pat t-mobile. she'd never been more part of his life and work than when they travel together during the vice presidency years. president so years. circling the circumstances had changed. now they traveled with a huge entourage of aids, security personnel and reporters. her husband's faith in her abilitie
at the peer review journal of foreign policy and the senior contributor to the. [indiscernible] which many of us, the first things we looked at in the morning. >> after? >> after. and a member of the court association of america. the clerk for the hon. warship berge john and barquette . and while a law student he was an editor from the yale law journal. i believe that is accredited. so as you can see, at two very talented. their debate is entitled to, detention policies. the way we set it up was we have -- in the book we will do it as live. steven will start and then will have great respond. >> great. thank you. it's a pleasure to be here. >> seven the fortitude to invite me to participate. i am a firm believer that the best they we can do as academics is raise the level debate. projects like this can only help in that regard with folks actually engaging with each other as opposed to talking past each other. let me offer couple of brief remarks that i lost a consistent with what i said in the book. i want to suggest that of all the myriad questions one could ask about the future of u.s. de
several nonfiction titles included in foreign policy magazine must read books. >> booktv is here at the annual national press club authors night and joining us now is author r. renshaw agree who has written a book called first cameraman. what is with the obama administration. >> is a videographer, sent in a carriage for a few years in the white house. the lifecycle did not work on the campaign formally or the white house power to the new and strange world of super pacs and independent expenditures. spectaculars about the campaign into destiny. as you get hooked up in a president? >> it is the right place, right time. a friend of mine was working at cnn as a documentary producer and has a more normal path into politics. i was not the first on anyone's list. she would knew i wanted to get involved in broadband and then i just hit it off with the senator and started traveling inside the bubble. >> how long did you do it? was a 24/7 for a while? >> you know, especially on the campaign, it really felt like 20 for seven. i was practically living in chicago when i was there too were thr
are making on the vigor transforming the role of the day so very unfortunate results. you talk about foreign policy as being at least two ideas or and although she's in play and i would be interested -- i keep on thinking that you are a vietnam analogy by and we must stand tough but you wouldn't subscribe to that. >> it's a special representation in the first place which dominates the rest of the book and in vietnam i think you have to take them both together. you cannot be in munich or vietnam. munich is an ethnology that tends to thrive when the country has been in peace and prosperity for long enough it feels it can do anything. it feels it can intervene on behalf of subject and oppressed people around the world and it doesn't think about the cost it hasn't had to pay the cost for several decades now. vietnam is about taking care of one's own the and paying attention to how things can go wrong despite the best of intentions. if he were a total vietnam person you will be such a realist that would be crude you wouldn't have anything on the interest and to the nation requires ideals for the
journal." a look at the biggest foreign policy events of 2012, our guest is ely lake of news week and the daily beast. then the biggest political stories of 2012. we'll look at that with juan williams. "washington journal" starts every morning at 7 eastern on c-span. >> as we wait for this pro forma session to get under way, some information about programming happening the day after christmas. c-span spoke with two retiring lawmakers, congressman dan burton and senator kent conrad. mr. burton, an indiana republican, served in congress for 30 years, and in the 1990s chaired the house oversight committee. senator conrad, the north dakota democrat, has been in office for 20 years and chairs the senate budget committee. our interview with congressman burton is at 8 p.m. wednesday night and senator conrad follows at 8:30. the presiding officer: the senate will come to order. the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c, december 24, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint th
. the foreign policy was that significant, and its domestic ramifications were that significant. jefferson was terrified that the british were coming back. the good thing about this argument is they did, so you win. you win the argument. the war of 1812 happened. and so we had to have a ratifying conflict which jefferson always suspected. and i think was, in some ways, the inevitable result of the unlikely victory we won in the first place, this odd coastal republic that managed to defeat the world's greatest empire. jefferson wanted us to see him as a, see himself as a defender and parent of this revolution in the sense of the great thinker, the great arcticlator of the principles of republican liberty. and he was that. but he was also an awfully good vote getter and deal cutter. and i think that's okay because, as jefferson himself said, it is best to give as well as to take in a system like ours. and without mutual concessions, the republic itself would crack and crumble and be vulnerable to the kind of reaction, the kind of returning monarchy and mono-- monoaround kim -- we didn't say
on the non-fiction selections. these titles were included in foreign policy magazines must read books to give in breakout nations in pursuit of the next economic miracles on the set is another author we want to introduce you to a and this is brian. here is his book castor's secrets the cia and the intelligence machine. if you could start by giving us your background, particularly your cia background. >> i worked at the national intelligence council in washington for about 45 years. i ultimately became the national intelligence officer for latin america which is a tree or four-star military equivalent but it's a pretty substantial position and i had the responsibility for all of latin america and cuba and the analytical side of intelligence. estimate what does that mean? >> i was not a field operative. i didn't go out and conduct espionage or meet foreign agents. i was basically most of my career at the headquarters in virginia i had the national intelligence estimates, quite a few on cuba over the years, and many of the other latin american countries. >> before we get into fidel castro and th
think having programs that help manufacturers identify foreign markets and resources is critical. the third, i think you have to look at trade and tax policies. there is no doubt in my mind that china's policies are unfair, and not just to american workers. in my judgment, they are unfair to their own middle class. they are supporting elite exporters who have crony relationships with the regime at the expense of giving consumers access to the best products in the world, and we have to make economic fairness of the highest priority in our bilateral relationships with china, and then on tax policy, we have to look at how do we insent vise manufacturers with the right tax credits to invest in the united states? thank you. >> i wondered about obama's national export initiative, doubling them by 2014 if i'm correctly. >> i didn't plant the question. [laughter] >> so i was just wondering, first of all, what do we export? like, what would you say are the strengths where you export, and secondly, what do you think can be done by the government or other institutions in order to promote th
were included in "foreign policy" magazine's must read books.
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11